Category «Reference Resources»

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, April 30, 2022

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Amazon Workers Can Now Keep Cell Phones at Work; Best Reverse Image Search Tool: Google, Bing, Pixsy, Tineye; Google adds more ways to remove yourself from Search results; and Shut Stalkers Out of Your Tech.

Subjects: Blockchain, Civil Liberties, Communications, Cybersecurity, Economy, Privacy, Reference Resources, Search Engines, Search Strategies

A bit about PURLs

Ed Summers, librarian, metadata expert, teacher, and computational expert, delivers an insighful lesson on the Persistent Uniform Resource Locator. PURLs were developed to make URLs more resilient and persistent over time. You could put a PURL into a catalog record and if the URL it pointed to needed to change you changed the redirect on the PURL server, and all the places that pointed to the PURL didn’t need to change. It was a beautifully simple idea, and has influenced other approaches like DOI and Handle. But this simplicity depends on a commitment to keeping the PURL up to date.

Subjects: Archives, Cataloging, Digital Archives, Information Architecture, Information Management, Information Mapping, Internet Resources - Web Links, KM, Reference Resources, Search Strategies

Information Quality Resources 2022

Librarians, researchers, journalists, teachers and students are continually confronted with what can be described as a kind of information miasma when using online sites, databases, resources, images and social media. No sector or discipline is immune to misinformation, disinformation, hoaxes, lack of data quality, and biased research. This guide by Marcus Zillman highlights actionable resources to evaluate and identify online malfeasance, as well as sources to verify information and data quality that is critical to our professions. These two efforts often intersect, and require vigilance and continuing education respective to effectively confronting the challenges they present.

Subjects: Big Data, Competitive Intelligence, Education, Information Management, Internet Resources - Web Links, KM, Libraries & Librarians, Reference Resources, Search Strategies, Social Media, Technology Trends, Viruses & Hoaxes

Finding People Resources and Sites 2022

This guide by Marcus Zillman identifies a wide range of free and fee based resources from which to choose to conduct people searches as well as brand and company reputation research, for business or personal reasons. It is important to note that the largest and most prominent data aggregators resell their content to other sites. In addition, data on free and some fee based sites may not be cleansed and can include inaccuracies that range from minor to critical. Also, many sites offer free search but charge a fee to review the results. It is therefore advisable to use multiple sources in your research and compare and contrast results before pursuing the use of these data.

Subjects: Big Data, Business Research, Competitive Intelligence, Data Mining, KM, Legal Research, LEXIS, Reference Resources, Search Engines, Search Strategies, Social Media, Westlaw

Justia Portal by the Numbers: Resources for Aspiring Lawyers (And Practicing Lawyers Too!)

Justia’s mission is to make the law and legal resources free for all. In keeping with this mission, the Justia Portal offers free access to statutes from all 50 states, cases from federal courts and the highest state courts, legal guides, and more! While these resources make the law more accessible to the general public, they also help aspiring lawyers just beginning their journeys into the profession and ease the early stages of legal research for practicing attorneys looking for quick access to relevant laws. Additionally, Justia Law Schools helps prospective law students (and those already studying to become lawyers) gather information on U.S. law schools and the law school admissions process. In this post, Justia’s team shares some data about some of the most frequently viewed law schools nationwide, as well as some information about the most viewed provisions of the law and cases on their site.

Subjects: Court Resources, KM, Legal Education, Legal Profession, Legal Research, Legal Technology, Online Legal Research Services, Reference Resources, Search Engines

Education and Academic Resources 2021

Marcus P. Zillman’s guide comprises an extensive listing of resources and sites for students, researchers, teachers, infopros and parents, on multiple study areas. Sourced from academic, public, private, association and corporate sectors, the subject matters include: distance learning; MOOCs, lecture guides and study notes, study skill resources, online tutoring and homework help, free e-learning videos, scholarship resources and PhD, Dissertation, thesis, and academic writing resources.

Subjects: Distance Learning, Education, KM, Reference Resources, Search Engines, Search Strategies, Training

Investing in Libraries is the Right Thing for Administrators To Do, Even if There Are Fewer Resources Overall

Todd A. Carpenter advocates for libraries at this critical juncture when remote learning is now pervasive for academic institutions around the country. Although digitized resources delivered via IP-based authentication were the norm before the pandemic, users of library resources were only vaguely aware that the services they regularly use are provided by the library because of IP-based authentication. Carpenter argues that the need for budget cuts must be weighed against the expanded and critical need for students and faculty to have uninterrupted access to digital resources provided by their libraries.

Subjects: Distance Learning, Economy, Education, KM, Libraries & Librarians, Reference Resources, Reference Services, Technology Trends, Telecommuting, Virtual Library

Book Review: A Short And Happy Guide To Advanced Legal Research

Nicole L. Black’s review highlights this book’s breadth of coverage and its format, information about a variety of free online tools, including public records databases, newsletters, and encyclopedias, and case law and statutes, fee-based legal research tools, as well as traditional case law and statutory research tools, and cutting edge AI-based legal research and data analytics software.

Subjects: AI, Book Reviews, Legal Research, LEXIS, Online Legal Research Services, Reference Resources, Westlaw

Student Research Resources 2020

This timely and extensive guide by Marcus Zillman includes resources for students, teachers and parents who together begin this school year with most, or in many cases, all of their courses conducted via online distance learning. The guide includes a wide range of links to augment and expand your current toolkit, including: open textbooks and learning resources for all subjects; free online courses; tutorial resources; educational search engines; video lectures and talks; tools to capture and organize ideas; comparing prices on new an used textbooks; and strategies for organizing notes for comprehensive exams.

Subjects: Distance Learning, Education, Internet Resources - Web Links, KM, Open Source, Reference Resources, Search Engines, Search Strategies, Technology Trends

As libraries go digital, paper books still have a lot to offer us

Ksenya Kiebuzinski, University of Toronto Libraries, offers perspective on how librarians face challenges in maintaining traditional means of accessing and delivering information to our users while embracing innovative media. We appreciate the value of both analogue (print books, manuscripts, maps, globes) and digital resources like Google Maps, databases and digital archives. One format captures the history of institutions in general, and of libraries, in particular. The other allows for more equitable and experimental access. Yet, being an advocate for print can be a thankless task. For librarians in all sectors this article is a lessons learned to share with colleagues and decision makers.

Subjects: Archives, Big Data, Education, Information Management, KM, Libraries & Librarians, Library Marketing, Reference Resources