Category «Legal Research»

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, February 4, 2023

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Have a Conversation (Not a Lecture) About Fraud With Older Adults; List of consumer reporting companies; Cybersecurity High-Risk Series: Challenges in Securing Federal Systems and Information; and NIST debuts long-anticipated AI risk management framework.

Subjects: Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, E-Commerce, Financial System, Healthcare, Legal Research, Privacy

2023 Healthcare MiniGuide

Marcus P. Zillman’s guide addresses the challenging landscape of healthcare information that proliferates on the internet. A large measure of the information hosted on self described authoritative health and healthcare sites is grounded in speculative, e-commerce drive subject matter. Search engines drive traffic to these sites with no transparent and accountable data – the objective being SEO, web tracking and other revenue driven applications. This guide identifies reliable, accurate sites that publish data and research, as well as provide applications, on traditional western as well as some eastern medicine, sponsored and published by government, NGO/IGO, research and academic institutions, hospitals, subject matter journals – in the United States and abroad.

Subjects: Health, Healthcare, Internet Resources, Search Engines, Search Strategies

Disquiet in the archives: archivists make tough calls with far-reaching consequences – they deserve our support

Stuart Kells, Adjunct Professor, College of Arts, Social Sciences and Commerce, La Trobe University explains why for technological, ethical and political reasons, the world’s archivists are suddenly very busy. Advances in digital imaging and communications are feeding an already intense interest in provenance, authorship and material culture. Two recent discoveries – a woman’s name scratched in the margins of an 8th-century manuscript, and John Milton’s annotations in a copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio held in the Free Library of Philadelphia – are examples of how new tools are revealing new evidence, and how distant scholars are making fascinating connections. At the same time, and even more importantly, the holdings of archives, libraries and museums – “memory institutions” – are being scrutinised as the world grapples with legacies of racism, imperialism, slavery and oppression. Some of the holdings speak to heinous episodes and indefensible values. And some of them were flat-out stolen.

Subjects: Digital Archives, Discovery, Education, Internet Resources, KM, Legal Research, Libraries & Librarians, Technology Trends

Is It Equitable to Protect Corporate Leaders From Covid-19 More than Employees and Customers?

Augie Ray asks a simple question to encourage you to think more about #COVID19 risks and engage in a discussion about equity in the workplace: If the world’s top business leaders recognize and take precautions against COVID during an ongoing pandemic, shouldn’t they ensure the same for employees and customers? Shouldn’t our companies’ commitment to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion suggest equal treatment for everyone?

Subjects: Communications, Economy, Education, Employment Law, Healthcare, Leadership, Legal Research

Long COVID stemmed from mild cases of COVID-19 in most people, according to a new multicountry study

Even mild COVID-19 cases can have major and long-lasting effects on people’s health. That is one of the key findings from our recent multicountry study on long COVID-19 – or long COVID – per a new research study by Dr. Sarah Wulf Hanson and Prof. Theo Vos, recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Subjects: Economy, Healthcare

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 21, 2023

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Apple Faces Third Class-Action Lawsuit Over Privacy Problems; Will Europe’s Privacy Bill of Rights Ever Truly Be Enforced?; Cybersecurity High-Risk Series: Challenges in Establishing a Comprehensive Cybersecurity Strategy and Performing Effective Oversight; and How ChatGPT Hijacks Democracy.

Subjects: AI, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Legal Research, Privacy, Social Media

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 8, 2023

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: The Hidden Cost of Cheap TVs; Cloud email services bolster encryption against hackers; Did ChatGPT Write That? College Kid Creates AI Essay Detector; and the FBI’s Perspective on Ransomware.

Subjects: AI, Cybersecurity, Education, Email Security, Encryption, KM, Legal Research, Privacy, Spyware, Technology Trends

Inventing the Dark Web

This paper by Thais Sardá, Simone Natale and John Downey examines how the deep Web, i.e., Web sites that are not indexed and thus are not accessible through Web search engines, was described and represented in British newspapers. Through an extensive content analysis conducted on 833 articles about the deep Web published between 2001 and 2017 by six British newspapers, the authors demonstrate that these technologies were predominantly associated with crime, crypto markets and immoral content, while positive uses of this technology, such as protecting privacy and freedom of speech, were largely disregarded. The consistent association by the British press between the deep Web and criminal and antisocial behaviors is exemplary of a recent “apocalyptic turn” in the imaginary of the Web, whereby Web-related technologies are perceived and portrayed in more negative ways within the public sphere. The authors argue that the use of such negative concepts, definitions and associations engender distrust about uses of the deep Web, propagating user stereotypes that reflect what the authors argue to be an overall criminalization of privacy.

Subjects: Criminal Law, Cryptocurrency, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Financial System, KM, Legal Research, Privacy

Going Grey and Facing Age Discrimination: Moving Towards an International Treaty on the Rights of Older Persons

For more than two decades attorney Catherine Morris has conducted research, education, and advocacy in the field of international human rights. Her article illuminates an issue that impacts vast numbers of people regardless of nationality. Concerns for the well being of older persons are rarely framed as human rights issues entrenched in age discrimination. This may now be changing after the shocking revelations of maltreatment and excess deaths of older persons in Canadian care homes in 2020. In the United States, the CDC continues to report that 90% percentage of COVID-19 deaths compromise those 65 and older. In both Canada and the U.S. the epicenter of the mortality burden of Covid is among those referred to as “elderly.” Morris states the abuses exposed in 2020 were predictable consequences of Canada’s longstanding neglect of older persons’ fundamental rights. Decades of efforts by Canadian civil society organizations (CSOs) along with international CSOs, and UN human rights bodies may now be gaining traction in a drive for a United Nations (UN) treaty to spell out and guarantee the fundamental human rights of older persons around the world. But efforts may continue to stall until leaders in Canada and other countries come to grips with the root cause of the abuses – endemic ageism.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Elder Law, Government Resources, Healthcare, Legal Research