Category «Legal Research»

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, September 18, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Apple’s Plan to Scan Your Phone Raises the Stakes on a Key Question: Can You Trust Big Tech?; ‘Breach of trust’: Police using QR check-in data to solve crimes; Agencies may want to establish a national strategy for contact-tracing apps; and Americans have little trust in online security: AP-NORC poll.

Subjects: Big Data, Blockchain, Computer Security, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Data Mining, Gadgets/Gizmos, Healthcare, Legal Research, Privacy

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, September 12, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: 8 Easy Ways to Stay Anonymous Online; Education Department Updates Rules and Criminal Penalties for Accessing Agency Data; ProtonMail Shares Activist’s IP Address With Authorities Despite Its “No Log” Claims; and As flood alerts lit up phones, did ‘warning fatigue’ set in?

Subjects: Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Email Security, Encryption, International Legal Research, Legal Research, Privacy, Social Media

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, September 4, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Expired Driver’s Licenses Open Lane for Cybercriminals; Tips for Victims of Unemployment Benefit Fraud; Fraud Alert: Malicious QR Codes Now Used by Online Scammers; and FBI-CISA Advisory on Ransomware Awareness for Holidays and Weekends.

Subjects: Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Privacy, Social Media

2021 Update to Choosing Law Librarianship: Thoughts for People Contemplating a Career Move

AALL Gallagher Award recipient Mary Whisner, Public Services Librarian, University of Washington, Marian Gould Gallagher Law Library, has updated her 2008 guide about choosing a career in law librarianship. With more than 30 years of experience in the profession, Whisner discusses important topics to review when considering a career as a law librarian.

Subjects: American Association of Law Libraries, Education, Law Librarians, Law Library Management, Legal Research, Libraries & Librarians, Reference Services

Academic and Scholar Search Engines and Sources 2021

Marcus Zillman’s new guide provides a wealth of information to enhance your efforts in conducting expert research on a wide range of subject matters. The guide is also another reminder that Google should not be your go-to subject search engine by demonstrating how choosing to use reliable topic specific sources can deliver greater scope, breath and depth of information for your analysis and reporting. These sites include metasearch, semantic and Deep Web search, with many sources offering advanced search functionality, unique and comprehensive data sets and repositories, dashboards and tools from around the world, all of which are updated and curated effectively and consistently. These sources represent the work of academic, government, consortium, firms and industry.

Subjects: Competitive Intelligence, Education, KM, Legal Research, Search Engines, Search Strategies

Data privacy laws in the US protect profit but prevent sharing data for public good – people want the opposite

Cason Schmit, Brian N. Larson and Hye-Chung Kum are faculty at the school of public health and the law school at Texas A&M University with expertise in health information regulation, data science and online contracts. U.S. data protection laws often widely permit using data for profit but are more restrictive of socially beneficial uses. They wanted to ask a simple question: Do U.S. privacy laws actually protect data in the ways that Americans want? Using a national survey, we found that the public’s preferences are inconsistent with the restrictions imposed by U.S. privacy laws.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Digital Archives, Health, Healthcare, Information Management, KM, Privacy

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, August 28, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: How Extortion Scams and Review Bombing Trolls Turned Goodreads Into Many Authors’ Worst Nightmare; Facial Recognition Technology: Current and Planned Uses by Federal Agencies; FBI sends its first-ever alert about a ‘ransomware affiliate’; and Who Will The Cybersecurity Bells Toll For?

Subjects: AI, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Food & Drug Law, Health, Healthcare, Legal Research, Medical Research, Privacy

IPCC climate report: Profound changes are underway in Earth’s oceans and ice – a lead author explains what the warnings mean

Humans are unequivocally warming the planet, and that’s triggering rapid changes in the atmosphere, oceans and polar regions, and increasing extreme weather around the world, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warns in a new report. The IPCC released the first part of its much anticipated Sixth Assessment Report on Aug. 9, 2021. In it, 234 scientists from around the globe summarized the current climate research on how the Earth is changing as temperatures rise and what those changes will mean for the future. This is a conversation with climate scientist Robert Kopp, a lead author of the chapter on Earth’s oceans, ice and sea level rise, about the profound changes underway.

Subjects: Environmental Law

Machines Learning the Rule of Law – EU Proposes the World’s first Artificial Intelligence Act

Sümeyye Elif Biber is a PhD Candidate in Law and Technology at the Scuola Sant’Anna in Pisa. In 21 April 2021, the European Commission (EC) proposed the world’s first Artificial Intelligence Act (AIA). The proposal has received a warm welcome across the EU as well as from the US, as it includes substantial legal provisions on ethical standards. After its release, the media’s main focus laid on the proposal’s “Brussels Effect”, which refers to the EU’s global regulatory influence: EU laws exceed their “local” influence and become global standards. With the AIA, the EU has the potential to become the world’s “super-regulator” on AI. More than the Brussels Effect, however, the emphasis should lie on the EU’s intention to explicitly protect the rule of law against the “rule of technology”. Despite this expressed goal, the normative power of the regulation to ensure the protection of the rule of law seems inadequate and raises serious concerns from the perspective of fundamental rights protection. This shortcoming becomes most evident across three main aspects of the AIA, namely in the regulation’s definition of AI systems, the AI practices it prohibits, and the preeminence of a risk-based approach.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Civil Liberties, Legal Research, Privacy