Category «United States Law»

Cybercrime and Digital Transformation

Cybercrime is on the rise all around the world. As more companies adopt technology such as artificial intelligence (AI), big data, and cloud computing, they become more vulnerable to hackers who want to gain access to the valuable information stored on their systems. It is estimated that cybercrime costs companies over £3.1 billion in 2020 alone on a global level. Imran Zaman, an expert on Digital Disruption with Fortune 500 companies, advises regardless of whether you are a large corporation or a small business, cybercrime is something everyone needs to be concerned about in the Age of Digital Transformation.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Blockchain, Computer Security, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Email, Email Security, Firewalls, Privacy, Software, Spyware

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, November 21, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Analyzing News Manipulation by State Actors’; Privacy experts say to choose vaccination apps wisely; New Federal Government Cybersecurity Incident and Vulnerability Response Playbooks; and Ransomware is now a giant black hole that is sucking in all other forms of cybercrime.

Subjects: Big Data, Criminal Law, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Economy, Financial System, Government Resources, KM, Privacy, Social Media, Spyware

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, November 14, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Report: 51% of IT leaders don’t think they could mitigate a data breach; US Education Dept urged to boost K-12 schools’ ransomware defenses; Digital driver’s licenses: Are they secure enough for us to trust?; and Allow App To Track On Your iPhone—Here’s What It Means.

Subjects: Congress, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cybersecurity, Education, Privacy, Social Media

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, November 7, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: The U.S. Blacklists Makers of Cops’ Favorite iPhone Hacking Tool; 10 Privacy Settings Every Amazon User Should Enable Right Now; Experts Sound Alarm On ‘Stalkerware,’ Which Can Easily Be Downloaded On Your Phone Without You Knowing; and A Drone Tried to Disrupt the Power Grid. It Won’t Be the Last.

Subjects: Congress, Criminal Law, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw Legislation, Cybersecurity, Financial System, Privacy, Social Media

Employing My Law Librarian Skills on an Uncertain Road

As we all navigate through the era of Covid, it is critical to learn from the myriad other medical challenges that many Americans, as well as our professional colleagues, are facing separate from the pandemic. Taryn L. Rucinski, Supervisory Librarian, U.S. Court of International Trade, shares her ongoing experience with the diagnosis of acoustic neuroma. Rucinski believes in the value of showing that its okay to take a step back, to step down, to lateral, to just take a breath in the face of challenges and adversity. She continues, saying experience has also shown her that our skills as law librarians are far more valuable than we may give them credit for. She highlights four significant factors that have kept her on the road to recovery: the unflagging support of the LLAGNY community, the flexibility and skills she has honed in her profession, and the importance of self care.

Subjects: Health, Healthcare, Law Librarians, Libraries & Librarians

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, October 31, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: You can now remove pictures of minors from Google Search — here’s how; The Identity Theft Resource Center’s Inaugural 2021 Business Aftermath Report; and Millions Of Patient Health Records Now At Risk Through Unregulated API’s.

Subjects: Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Email, Email Security, Privacy, Search Engines, Social Media

Steve Bannon is held in criminal contempt of Congress, pushing key question over presidential power to the courts

Jennifer L. Selin Professor of Constitutional Democracy, reviews how this battle between the two branches of government over access to presidential information raises questions about the constitutional authority of Congress and how lawmakers acquire the information needed to hold the executive branch accountable in the U.S. system of separation of powers.

Subjects: Congress, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, Government Resources, Legal Research, United States Law

Trump wants the National Archives to keep his papers away from investigators – post-Watergate laws and executive orders may not let him

Professor Shannon Bow O’Brien is a presidency scholar who focuses upon rhetoric. She discusses how the National Archives usually goes on with its work with little attention, but that is now at the center of a political fight about the public’s access to the papers of former President Donald Trump.

Subjects: Archives, Criminal Law, Freedom of Information, Government Resources, Information Management, KM, Legal Research