Category «Congress»

We are STENO. This is why we are still here.

The February 2021 Senate impeachment trail of Donald Trump was a significant example of the critical work done by America’s stenographers. Ana Fatima Costa broadens our awareness about her profession whose members have been providing immediate transcription of the spoken word via cutting-edge CAT technology known as “realtime” (from shorthand to English) since the 1960s. Costa describes how her colleagues work diligently as guardians of the record in a challenging, stressful job capturing the spoken word in high-profile events, providing verbatim, accurate, official transcripts for Congressional hearings, in deposition rooms, at trials, arbitrations, and for captioning services used by media organizations.

Subjects: Congress, Court Resources, Courts & Technology, Government Resources, KM, Legislative, Litigation Support

46,218 news transcripts show ideologically extreme politicians get more airtime

Professors Joshua Darr, Jeremey Padgett and Johanna Dunaway research how changes in the media have shifted the incentives of elected officials and the considerations of voters, and what that means for American democracy. In recent work, they showed that extremely conservative and extremely liberal legislators receive far more airtime on cable and broadcast news than their moderate counterparts.

Subjects: AI, Communications, Congress, KM, Legislative, Social Media

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, February 13, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Paper – A First Look at Zoombombing; Google Chrome’s engineering director discusses how the company is trying to preserve digital advertising after tracking cookies are killed off; NSF pushing for agency-specific cyber-physical research; and They Stormed the Capitol. Their Apps Tracked Them.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Congress, Cybersecurity, KM, Legal Research, Legislative, Privacy, Search Engines, Search Strategies, Technology Trends

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 23, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: This Site Published Every Face From Parler’s Capitol Riot Videos; DHS Gets Sued Over Its Social Media Surveillance Tactics; and Lost Passwords Lock Millionaires Out of Their Bitcoin Fortunes; and The risks of DDoS attacks for the public sector.

Subjects: Congress, Criminal Law, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Digital Archives, Financial System, KM, Privacy, Social Media, Technology Trends

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, December 5, 2020

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Fake calls from Apple and Amazon support: What you need to know; How to wipe your old Windows PC clean before getting rid of it; How a Grad Student Found Spyware That Could Control Anybody’s iPhone from Anywhere in the World; and Artificial Intelligence in Health Care: Benefits and Challenges of Technologies to Augment Patient Care.

Subjects: AI, Computer Security, Congress, Courts & Technology, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Email Security, Healthcare, KM, Legal Research, Legislative, Mobile Technology, Privacy, United States Law

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, October 31, 2020

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Ransomware Guide; Police are using facial recognition for minor crimes because they can; COVID-19 clinical trial: real or fake? Learn how to tell the difference; and Here’s how companies got your phone number and a way to prevent future calls.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Congress, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Internet Use Policies, KM, Libraries & Librarians, Privacy, Social Media

You have rights when you go to vote – and many people are there to help if there’s trouble at the polls

Despite all the challenges to this year’s election – long lines, calls for voter intimidation, baseless claims of fraud – voting is a fundamental civil right. As a political scientist who studies campaigns and elections, Daniel R. Birdsong has confidence in American democracy. Lots of people are working at the polls and behind the scenes to ensure election 2020 runs smoothly and safely. In this article Birdsong outlines your rights as a voter and explain where to turn if you encounter trouble at the polls.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Congress, Constitutional Law, Free Speech, KM, Legal Research, Librarian Resources

Why there’s so much legal uncertainty about resolving a disputed presidential election

As stated in this article by Richard Pildes, Professor of Constitutional Law, New York University – the Constitution does not create rules or an institutional structure for resolving a modern, disputed presidential election. It provides a fail-safe mechanism for only one situation, which has not happened since 1824: If no candidate gets the necessary majority of votes in the Electoral College, then the House picks the president from the top three Electoral College candidates. But that’s not the path the most disputed presidential elections have taken since 1824. Nor is it the likely path if this year brings us to that dark place.

Subjects: Congress, Constitutional Law, Legal Education, Legal Research, United States Law

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, October 25, 2020

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Trump Administration Develops Governmentwide Office Reopening Guidelines, With Contractor Help; USPS looks to monetize its mapping data; Amazon Faces Allegations It Harvested Sensitive Voice Data; and Google: Chinese Hackers Are Posing as McAfee to Install Malware.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Communications, Congress, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Data Mining, Government Resources, Health, Healthcare, Legal Research, Legislative, Privacy, Social Media, United States Law

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, October 18, 2020

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Amazon’s Latest Gimmicks Are Pushing the Limits of Privacy; Data Security: Recent K-12 Data Breaches Show That Students Are Vulnerable to Harm; How to Implement implement zero trust without impacting productivity; and ‘So hard to prove you exist’: Flawed fraud protections deny unemployment to millions.

Subjects: Congress, Criminal Law, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cybersecurity, E-Commerce, Education, Email Security, Encryption, Legal Research, Legal Technology, Privacy, Telecommuting