Category «AI»

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, October 116, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Government Secretly Orders Google To Identify Anyone Who Searched A Sexual Assault Victim’s Name, Address And Telephone Number; Study reveals Android phones constantly snoop on their users; Ongoing Cyber Threats to U.S. Water and Wastewater Systems Sector Facilities; and What Google learned after analyzing 80M ransomware samples: 5 things to know.

Subjects: AI, Congress, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Economy, Government Resources, Healthcare, Privacy, Search Engines

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, October 2, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Apple’s App Tracking Transparency Feature Doesn’t Stop Tracking; New Chrome feature can tell sites and webapps when you’re idle; Bye Google: 7 privacy-first search engines everyone should try; and Troll farms reached 140 million Americans a month on Facebook before 2020 election, internal report shows.

Subjects: AI, Business Research, KM, Privacy, Search Engines, Search Strategies, Social Media

How Can We Help To Free Legal Research From Algorithmic Bias?

Stephanie Farne, Legal Information Librarian and Lecturer in Law at Boston College Law School, raises increasingly important issues respective to the bias inherent in artificial intelligence powered search algorithms, both on the Internet and in commercial databases.

Subjects: AI, Law Librarians, Legal Education, Legal Research, Legal Research Training, Online Legal Research Services, Technology Trends

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, September 25, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Landlords Use Secret Algorithms to Screen Potential Tenants. Find Out What They’ve Said About You; Even the NSA Agrees: Targeted Ads Are Terrifying; Massive Troll Farms Revealed to Be Operating on Facebook; and Ninth Circuit Says Warrantless Search of Google Files Automatically Reported to Police.

Subjects: AI, Competitive Intelligence, Congress, Criminal Law, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Economy, Financial System, Privacy, Search Engines, Social Media

Data privacy laws in the US protect profit but prevent sharing data for public good – people want the opposite

Cason Schmit, Brian N. Larson and Hye-Chung Kum are faculty at the school of public health and the law school at Texas A&M University with expertise in health information regulation, data science and online contracts. U.S. data protection laws often widely permit using data for profit but are more restrictive of socially beneficial uses. They wanted to ask a simple question: Do U.S. privacy laws actually protect data in the ways that Americans want? Using a national survey, we found that the public’s preferences are inconsistent with the restrictions imposed by U.S. privacy laws.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Digital Archives, Health, Healthcare, Information Management, KM, Privacy

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, August 28, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: How Extortion Scams and Review Bombing Trolls Turned Goodreads Into Many Authors’ Worst Nightmare; Facial Recognition Technology: Current and Planned Uses by Federal Agencies; FBI sends its first-ever alert about a ‘ransomware affiliate’; and Who Will The Cybersecurity Bells Toll For?

Subjects: AI, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Food & Drug Law, Health, Healthcare, Legal Research, Medical Research, Privacy

Machines Learning the Rule of Law – EU Proposes the World’s first Artificial Intelligence Act

Sümeyye Elif Biber is a PhD Candidate in Law and Technology at the Scuola Sant’Anna in Pisa. In 21 April 2021, the European Commission (EC) proposed the world’s first Artificial Intelligence Act (AIA). The proposal has received a warm welcome across the EU as well as from the US, as it includes substantial legal provisions on ethical standards. After its release, the media’s main focus laid on the proposal’s “Brussels Effect”, which refers to the EU’s global regulatory influence: EU laws exceed their “local” influence and become global standards. With the AIA, the EU has the potential to become the world’s “super-regulator” on AI. More than the Brussels Effect, however, the emphasis should lie on the EU’s intention to explicitly protect the rule of law against the “rule of technology”. Despite this expressed goal, the normative power of the regulation to ensure the protection of the rule of law seems inadequate and raises serious concerns from the perspective of fundamental rights protection. This shortcoming becomes most evident across three main aspects of the AIA, namely in the regulation’s definition of AI systems, the AI practices it prohibits, and the preeminence of a risk-based approach.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Civil Liberties, Legal Research, Privacy

Robots are coming for the lawyers – which may be bad for tomorrow’s attorneys but great for anyone in need of cheap legal assistance

Imagine what a lawyer does on a given day: researching cases, drafting briefs, advising clients. While technology has been nibbling around the edges of the legal profession for some time, it’s hard to imagine those complex tasks being done by a robot. And it is those complicated, personalized tasks that have led technologists to include lawyers in a broader category of jobs that are considered pretty safe from a future of advanced robotics and artificial intelligence. As Professors Elizabeth C. Tippett and Charlotte Alexander discovered in a recent research collaboration to analyze legal briefs using a branch of artificial intelligence known as machine learning, lawyers’ jobs are a lot less safe than we thought. It turns out that you don’t need to completely automate a job to fundamentally change it. All you need to do is automate part of it.

Subjects: AI, Courts & Technology, KM, Legal Marketing

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, August 8, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: How to Defend Yourself Against NSO Spyware Like Pegasus; NIST revises flagship cyber resiliency guidance; Researchers Say They’ve Found a ‘Master Face’ to Bypass Face Rec Tech; and Ransomware poses threat to vulnerable local governments.

Subjects: AI, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, KM, Legal Research, Social Media, Telecommuting