Category «KM»

LLRX January 2023 Issue

Articles and Columns for January 2023

  • 2023 Healthcare MiniGuideMarcus P. Zillman’s guide addresses the challenging landscape of healthcare information that proliferates on the internet. A large measure of the information hosted on self described authoritative health and healthcare sites is grounded in speculative, e-commerce drive subject matter. Search engines drive traffic to these sites with no transparent and accountable data – the objective being SEO, web tracking and other revenue driven applications. This guide identifies reliable, accurate sites that publish data and research, as well as provide applications, on traditional western as well as some eastern medicine, sponsored and published by government, NGO/IGO, research and academic institutions, hospitals, subject matter journals – in the United States and abroad.
  • Disquiet in the archives: archivists make tough calls with far-reaching consequences – they deserve our supportStuart Kells, Adjunct Professor, College of Arts, Social Sciences and Commerce, La Trobe University explains why for technological, ethical and political reasons, the world’s archivists are suddenly very busy. Advances in digital imaging and communications are feeding an already intense interest in provenance, authorship and material culture. Two recent discoveries – a woman’s name scratched in the margins of an 8th-century manuscript, and John Milton’s annotations in a copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio held in the Free Library of Philadelphia – are examples of how new tools are revealing new evidence, and how distant scholars are making fascinating connections. At the same time, and even more importantly, the holdings of archives, libraries and museums – “memory institutions” – are being scrutinised as the world grapples with legacies of racism, imperialism, slavery and oppression. Some of the holdings speak to heinous episodes and indefensible values. And some of them were flat-out stolen.
  • Is It Equitable to Protect Corporate Leaders From Covid-19 More than Employees and Customers?Augie Ray asks a simple question to encourage you to think more about #COVID19 risks and engage in a discussion about equity in the workplace: If the world’s top business leaders recognize and take precautions against COVID during an ongoing pandemic, shouldn’t they ensure the same for employees and customers? Shouldn’t our companies’ commitment to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion suggest equal treatment for everyone?
  • Scribe faces a strong Chinese rival able to turn handwritten notes into searchable text – David H. Rothman may have identified one reason why the Kindle Scribe has gone on sale. For $400, Lenovo later this year is to sell a Scribe rival able to record lectures with two built-in mikes and turn handwritten notes into searchable text. Handily, you can sync the audio recordings with notes. Perhaps a tool for journalists, too, not just students?
  • ChatGPT Chatbot Weighs in on Law Librarian De-CredentializationSarah Gotschall, Associate Librarian Reference Librarian & Professor of Practice, University of Arizona Law, puts ChatGPT through the paces with a series of engaging questions and answers she has documented, adding additional dimension to the significant interest in the all the rage chatbot.
  • Long COVID stemmed from mild cases of COVID-19 in most people, according to a new multicountry study – Even mild COVID-19 cases can have major and long-lasting effects on people’s health. That is one of the key findings from our recent multicountry study on long COVID-19 – or long COVID – per a new research study by Dr. Sarah Wulf Hanson and Prof. Theo Vos, recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
  • Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 27, 2023Four highlights from this week: 7 Ways to Avoid Scammers on Social Media; Data explosion prompts agencies to look at advanced e-discovery platforms; Apple Cash, Cash App, Venmo, Zelle P2P Payment Apps Compared; and Everyone Wants Your Email Address. Think Twice Before Sharing It.
  • Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 21, 2023Four highlights from this week: Apple Faces Third Class-Action Lawsuit Over Privacy Problems; Will Europe’s Privacy Bill of Rights Ever Truly Be Enforced?; Cybersecurity High-Risk Series: Challenges in Establishing a Comprehensive Cybersecurity Strategy and Performing Effective Oversight; and How ChatGPT Hijacks Democracy.
  • Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 14, 2023Four highlights from this week: A college student made an app to detect AI-written text; Identity Thieves Bypassed Experian Security to View Credit Reports; Adobe Uses Your Content to Train AI; Millions of Vehicles at Risk: and API Vulnerabilities Uncovered in 16 Major Car Brands.
  • Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 8, 2023Four highlights from this week: The Hidden Cost of Cheap TVs; Cloud email services bolster encryption against hackers; Did ChatGPT Write That? College Kid Creates AI Essay Detector; and the FBI’s Perspective on Ransomware.

LLRX.com® – the free web journal on law, technology, knowledge discovery and research for Librarians, Lawyers, Researchers, Academics, and Journalists. Founded in 1996.

Subjects: KM

Disquiet in the archives: archivists make tough calls with far-reaching consequences – they deserve our support

Stuart Kells, Adjunct Professor, College of Arts, Social Sciences and Commerce, La Trobe University explains why for technological, ethical and political reasons, the world’s archivists are suddenly very busy. Advances in digital imaging and communications are feeding an already intense interest in provenance, authorship and material culture. Two recent discoveries – a woman’s name scratched in the margins of an 8th-century manuscript, and John Milton’s annotations in a copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio held in the Free Library of Philadelphia – are examples of how new tools are revealing new evidence, and how distant scholars are making fascinating connections. At the same time, and even more importantly, the holdings of archives, libraries and museums – “memory institutions” – are being scrutinised as the world grapples with legacies of racism, imperialism, slavery and oppression. Some of the holdings speak to heinous episodes and indefensible values. And some of them were flat-out stolen.

Subjects: Digital Archives, Discovery, Education, Internet Resources, KM, Legal Research, Libraries & Librarians, Technology Trends

Scribe faces a strong Chinese rival able to turn handwritten notes into searchable text

David H. Rothman may have identified one reason why the Kindle Scribe has gone on sale. For $400, Lenovo later this year is to sell a Scribe rival able to record lectures with two built-in mikes and turn handwritten notes into searchable text. Handily, you can sync the audio recordings with notes. Perhaps a tool for journalists, too, not just students?

Subjects: E-Books, KM, Libraries & Librarians

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 8, 2023

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: The Hidden Cost of Cheap TVs; Cloud email services bolster encryption against hackers; Did ChatGPT Write That? College Kid Creates AI Essay Detector; and the FBI’s Perspective on Ransomware.

Subjects: AI, Cybersecurity, Education, Email Security, Encryption, KM, Legal Research, Privacy, Spyware, Technology Trends

LLRX December 2022 Issue

Articles and Columns for December 2022 Inventing the Dark Web – This paper by Thais Sardá, Simone Natale, and John Downey examines how the deep Web, i.e., Web sites that are not indexed and thus are not accessible through Web search engines, was described and represented in British newspapers. Through an extensive content analysis conducted …

Subjects: KM

Inventing the Dark Web

This paper by Thais Sardá, Simone Natale and John Downey examines how the deep Web, i.e., Web sites that are not indexed and thus are not accessible through Web search engines, was described and represented in British newspapers. Through an extensive content analysis conducted on 833 articles about the deep Web published between 2001 and 2017 by six British newspapers, the authors demonstrate that these technologies were predominantly associated with crime, crypto markets and immoral content, while positive uses of this technology, such as protecting privacy and freedom of speech, were largely disregarded. The consistent association by the British press between the deep Web and criminal and antisocial behaviors is exemplary of a recent “apocalyptic turn” in the imaginary of the Web, whereby Web-related technologies are perceived and portrayed in more negative ways within the public sphere. The authors argue that the use of such negative concepts, definitions and associations engender distrust about uses of the deep Web, propagating user stereotypes that reflect what the authors argue to be an overall criminalization of privacy.

Subjects: Criminal Law, Cryptocurrency, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Financial System, KM, Legal Research, Privacy

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, December 24, 2022

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: The Trojan House Source: The Surveillance Technology Oversight Project; Google Takes Gmail Security to the Next Level with Client-Side Encryption; Hunting for Mastodon Servers; and ByteDance [aka TikTok] employees spied on U.S. journalists, audit finds.

Subjects: Business Research, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cybersecurity, Free Speech, KM, Privacy, Social Media, Technology Trends

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, December 10, 2022

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Apple Commits to Encrypting iCloud, Drops Phone-Scanning Plans; Darknet Markets Generate Millions in Revenue Selling Stolen Personal Data, Supply Chain Study Finds; Top EU court rules Google must delete inaccurate search results; and Who Is Collecting Data from Your Car?

Subjects: Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Data Mining, Encryption, KM, Legal Research, Privacy, Search Engines, Social Media, Technology Trends