Category «KM»

LLRX July 2022 Issue

Articles and Columns for July 2022

  • Policing Reimagined – The thesis of Albert Chang’s paper is the metaverse presents a unique opportunity for effective police reforms. Developers, data scientists and legal sector experts working within the metaverse may be able to implement changes more efficiently than Congress as they are not subject to constitutional constraints. Chang advocates a position that the federal government should strongly consider the adoption of immersive technology to demonstrate that a more effective method of policing is possible. This paper is especially noteworthy in light of the fact that last week Congress passed the CHIPS and Science Act which will bolster research with $290 billion in new funding.
  • Confidence in the Supreme Court is declining – but there is no easy way to oversee justices and their politics – Recent evidence showing that Virginia Thomas, wife of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, sent at least 29 text messages to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows urging him to help overturn the 2020 election has reignited a long-simmering debate about judicial ethics and the nation’s highest court. Professor Eve Ringsmuth writes, ”as a Supreme Court scholar, I think it is important to recognize that there is no formal code of conduct guiding the work of the Supreme Court, which contributes to a lack of clarity regarding the ethical boundaries for justices.”
  • Surveillance is pervasive: Yes, you are being watched, even if no one is looking for you Peter Krapp, Professor of Film & Media Studies, University of California, Irvine shares facts that we need to acknowledge. The United States has the largest number of surveillance cameras per person in the world. Cameras are omnipresent on city streets and in hotels, restaurants, malls and offices. They’re also used to screen passengers for the Transportation Security Administration. And then there are smart doorbells and other home security cameras. Importantly, Krapp highlights not only do we live in a surveillance nation, but those who surveil us do so with virtually no constraints or oversight.
  • Your Resume: Portrait or Passport Photo? Career Development for Lawyers—And Other Ambitious People – Attorney Jerry Lawson is a legal tech expert with decades of experience delivering effective presentations. In this, the second part of a multi part series, Lawson shares insightful recommendations and techniques to successfully manage what can be challenging interactions with audience members during the course of a presentation.
  • Light pollution is disrupting the seasonal rhythms of plants and trees, lengthening pollen season in US cities – City lights that blaze all night are profoundly disrupting urban plants’ phenology – shifting when their buds open in the spring and when their leaves change colors and drop in the fall. New research Yuyu Zhou coauthored shows how nighttime lights are lengthening the growing season in cities, which can affect everything from allergies to local economies. In the study, Zhous and his colleagues analyzed trees and shrubs at about 3,000 sites in U.S. cities to see how they responded under different lighting conditions over a five-year period. Plants use the natural day-night cycle as a signal of seasonal change along with temperature.
  • Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, July 30, 2022Four highlights from this week: Cyber insurance price hike hits local governments hard; New York Counties to Get Free Services to Better Defend Against Cyberattacks; Why emergency calls sometimes can’t get through; and A Rogues’ Gallery of Robocallers.
  • Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, July 23, 2022Four highlights from this week: Report: 47% of organizations experienced a voice phishing attack last year; Rising Cyberthreats Increase Cyber Insurance Premiums While Reducing Availability; FTC explains ‘reasonable’ cybersecurity; and Facebook has started to encrypt links to counter privacy-improving URL Stripping.
  • Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, July 16, 2022Four highlights from this week: Should we be worried about real-time facial recognition systems?; Some VPNs can’t be trusted. These are best at privacy and security; In a Post-Roe World, the Future of Digital Privacy Looks Even Grimmer; and Here’s how North Korean operatives are trying to infiltrate US crypto firms.
  • Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, July 9, 2022Four highlights from this week: Why more regulation of connected car technology is probably just up the road; Police sweep Google searches to find suspects. The tactic is facing its first legal challenge; Attackers are using deepfakes to snag remote IT jobs; and Free smartphone stalkerware detection tool gets dedicated hub.
  • Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, July 3, 2022Four highlights from this week: Vendors prep for new cyber rules of the road; USPS: It’s Up to Mailers to Comply With State Laws on Abortion Pills; Facial Recognition Technology: Federal Agencies’ Use and Related Privacy Protections; and Google Asks for Permission to Flood Inboxes With Campaign Spam.
LLRX.com® – the free web journal on law, technology, knowledge discovery and research for Librarians, Lawyers, Researchers, Academics, and Journalists. Founded in 1996.
Subjects: KM

Your Resume: Portrait or Passport Photo? Career Development for Lawyers—And Other Ambitious People

Jerry Lawson discusses how a good resume is more like a stylish portrait photo. A top portrait photographer uses lenses, lighting, composition, props and other tools to bring out the subject’s best features in an original way. Your resume should do no less for your professional qualifications. This actionable guide clearly identifies the elements and components that comprise an outstanding resume for attorneys and other legal professionals.

Subjects: Communication Skills, Competitive Intelligence, Job Hunting, KM, Legal Profession, Search Engines, Social Media

LLRX June 2022 Issue

Articles and Columns for June 2022 2022 Link Guide to Healthcare Resources – The pandemic and long COVID health issues have created heightened awareness and a growing need for factual online health information. This guide by Marcus P. Zillman identifies sources providing access to vetted health related research, tools for tracking and monitoring emerging issues …

Subjects: KM

The OCLC v Clarivate Dilemma

Librarian and tech expert Karen Coyle provides insight into the evolving conflict that caused OCLC to file suit against the company Clarivate which owns Proquest and ExLibris. The suit focuses on a metadata service proposed by Ex Libris called “MetaDoor.” MetaDoor isn’t a bibliographic database à la WorldCat, it is a peer-to-peer service that allows its users to find quality records in the catalog systems of other libraries.

Subjects: Information Architecture, KM, Librarian Resources, Libraries & Librarians, Library Software & Technology, Search Engines

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, June 18, 2022

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Your connected car could be putting your privacy at risk; Deepfakes on Trial: a Call to Expand the Trial Judge’s Gatekeeping Role to Protect Legal Proceedings from Technological Fakery; Genetic paparazzi are right around the corner, and courts aren’t ready to confront the legal quagmire of DNA theft; and Why You Should Delete (All) Your Tweets.

Subjects: Courts & Technology, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Ethics, Healthcare, KM, Legal Research, Privacy, Search Engines, Social Media, Technology Trends

How to Future

Kevin Kelly is a Web Maverick and by his own definition, a futurist. This discipline is comprised of really keen historians who study the past to see the future. They look carefully at the past because most of what will happen tomorrow is already happening today. In addition, most of the things in the future will be things that don’t change, so they are already here. The past is the bulk of our lives, and it will be the bulk in the future. It is highly likely that in 100 years or even 500 years, the bulk of the stuff surrounding someone will be old stuff, stuff that is being invented today. All this stuff, plus our human behaviors, which are very old, will continue in the future. For those who are engaged in understanding revisionist history in real time (the War in Ukraine, the January 6th Insurrection, the 2020 election, gun violence in America to name just a few issues), studying the past and the present gives us great insight into our future. Kelly’s multi disciplinary subject matter expertise make his work timely, relevant, significant and consequential.

Subjects: KM

LLRX May 2022 Issue

Articles and Columns for May 2022 If the Democratic Party is serious about preserving America as a constitutional republic, they better act fast – Thom Hartmann is a podcast personality, author, former psychotherapist, businessman, and progressive political commentator. He untangles the history of the Electoral College and unequal representation in the U.S. Senate to starkly …

Subjects: KM

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, May 30, 2022

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Five highlights from this week: Cyber security 101: Protect your privacy from hackers, spies, and the government; Inside the Government Fiasco That Nearly Closed the U.S. Air System; My Instagram account was hacked and two-factor authentication didn’t help; Serious Warning Issued For Millions Of Google Gmail Users; and Report: Russian Botnet Can Spam Social Media on ‘Massive Scale’.

Subjects: Communications, Criminal Law, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cybersecurity, E-Government, Economy, KM, Privacy, Social Media, Technology Trends, Travel

Language matters when Googling controversial people

Ahmed Al-Rawi, Assistant Professor, News, Social Media, and Public Communication, Simon Fraser University – identifies and explains how features of search engine autocomplete functions enables users to find fast answers to their questions or queries. However, autocomplete search functions are based on ambiguous algorithms that have been widely criticized because they often provide biased and racist results.

Subjects: AI, KM, News Resources, Search Engines, Search Strategies, Social Media