Category «KM»

Cut and Paste Opinions: A Turing Test for Judicial Decision-Making

Ken Strutin argues that cut-and-paste is a laudable method for reducing transcription errors in copying citations and quotations. However, he identifies that a problem arises when it is used to lift verbatim sections of a party’s arguments into a case decision. Stipulations and proposed orders from counsel for both parties might be enviable and practicable, but judgment and fact-finding are solely in the province of the court. This has been a long standing issue that has spanned technologies from shears and paste-pot to typewriters and computers, and which might culminate in a Turing Test for case law.

Subjects: Case Management, Court Resources, Courts & Technology, KM, Legal Profession

Computer Savviness: Step 4 to Information Literacy

Lorette Weldon shares her roadmap to Computer Savviness – be flexible enough to learn new concepts, methods, and technology developed for different kinds of communities – and do not be not averse to discovering and trying new applications and tools to learn and discern what may work best for your specific environment.

Subjects: Internet Trends, KM, Libraries & Librarians, Reference Resources, Reference Services, Search Strategies

IBM’s Watson is Now Data Mining TED Talks to Extract New Forms of Knowledge

Alan Rothman’s commentary offers actionable information about a new technology from IBM called Watson that is a powerful tool for researchers whose work engages data mining, knowledge management and competitive intelligence. Rothman attended a recent presentation that demonstrated how Watson is deployed as a search and discovery tool whose object is the huge video archive of TED Talks content.

Subjects: Business Research, Competitive Intelligence, KM

Step 2 to Information Literacy

In Part 2 of Lorette Weldon’s series, she emphasizes that to promote information literacy you would have to practice what you preach. You must retain customer interaction information so that you may add to it in forthcoming interactions. Thus says Weldon, the patrons experience both familiarity and warmth when they return to the library because the librarian remembers who they are and what they had been looking for in previous visits.

Subjects: KM, Libraries & Librarians, Library Marketing, Reference Services

The limits of ‘Hack the library’: Don’t aim for too much more with too much less–and try harder for more

David Rothman notes that less than 12 percent of U.S. public library spending goes for books and other items. So he is very much in favor of the “hack the library” movement reinventing libraries. At the same time, Rothman warns that all the technical ingenuity and creativity in the world is no substitute for sufficient funding in areas ranging from content to data security. The public’s needs, not the interests of techie volunteers, should count most of all.

Subjects: Gadgets, Information Management, Internet Trends, Internet Use Policies, KM, Open Source, Technology Trends, Virtual Library, Web Accessibility, Web Management, Web Utilities

Education and Academic Resources on the Internet

Marcus P. Zillman’s guide links researchers to a wide range of reliable resources for all professions and skill levels. Marcus covers topics including: education, chemistry, economics, mathematics, philosophy, engineering, MBA and PhD/Dissertation/Thesis/Academic Writing resources, as well as increasingly popular MOOCS/Open Courseware (OCW) resources.

Subjects: Features, Web-Based Training

Conclusions from the National Inventory of Legal Materials

Hays Butler and Emily Feltren document the process and successful implementation of dynamic, extensive project conducted over the past three years by the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) working with law librarian volunteers around the country to build the first-ever National Inventory of Legal Materials, an inventory of print and electronic legal materials at all levels of government. More than 350 volunteers have added nearly 8,000 legal titles to the inventory so far.

Subjects: American Association of Law Libraries, Features, Law Librarians, Law Library Management, Legal Research, Legal Technology, Libraries & Librarians, Library Software & Technology, Online Legal Research Services, Surveys

Tutorial Resources on the Internet

Marcus P. Zillman’s guide is a wide ranging and immediately useful listing of tutorial resources and sites on the Internet. This guide will assist you to discover, review and select the most relevant and reliable sources for your requirements, on topics that include: e-training, health sciences and biomedical research, educational opportunities for unemployed workers, effective web searching, statistical data mining, free college and university courses, programming in various open source applications, and technical support, user guides and repair services too!

Subjects: Communication Skills, Distance Learning, Features, Internet Resources - Web Links, Presentation Skills, Training, Web-Based Training

Veterans in the Criminal Justice System: Defending Conditions of the Mind

Ken Strutin’s guide includes key recent and notable cases, surveys, studies, guides, web resources and directories for legal research specific to veterans’ deployed to war who subsequently developed mental health problems, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PSTD).

Subjects: Criminal Law, Features, Human Rights, Legal Research, Surveys

SharePoint Blogging with Permission

Lorette S.J. Weldon continues to share her guides on how librarians in various sectors can effectively leverage SharePoint within the enterprise, in groups, and with individuals outside the organization. She refers to her 2010 survey, “How is SharePoint used in Libraries?” that found 16 out of 54 participants used SharePoint’s site features, such as the blog. Lorette provides insights and associated documentation on this application’s limitations, features, and operational structure.

Subjects: Internet Resources - Web Links, KM, Legal Technology
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