Category «Legal Ethics»

The FBI is breaking into corporate computers to remove malicious code – smart cyber defense or government overreach?

Cybersecurity scholar Scott Shackelford discusses how the FBI has the authority right now to access privately owned computers without their owners’ knowledge or consent, and to delete software. It’s part of a government effort to contain the continuing attacks on corporate networks running Microsoft Exchange software, and it’s an unprecedented intrusion that’s raising legal questions about just how far the government can go.

Subjects: Communications Law, Computer Security, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cybersecurity, Email Security, Legal Ethics, Legal Research, Legal Technology, Privacy

The legal regulation revolution

Attorney, legal sector analyst and author of the book Law Is A Buyer’s Market: Building a Client-First Law Firm, Jason Furlong’s long read offers insights on this unique time as North Americans venture briefly out of lockdown. Furlong states it seems like the right time to step back and consider the extraordinary shock-waved landscape of legal regulation change, and what it means for everyone. Furlong looks at four different dimensions in which law firm ethics models, legal services regulation, and lawyer licensing and competence standards are all beginning a process of transformation.

Subjects: Legal Ethics, Legal Profession

Securely Collaborate and Communicate Remotely: A How-To for Lawyers

Attorney and Legal Technology Evangelist Nicole L. Black delves into how collaborating effectively and confidentially has always been an important part of practicing law. The COIVD-19 pandemic has significantly increased the focus on identifying and implementing tools and techniques that enable secure communications and remote collaboration with team members and clients alike. Black recommends online portals as the perfect solution to this challenge.

Subjects: Communication Skills, Communications, KM, Law Firm Marketing, Law Firm Security, Legal Ethics, Legal Marketing, Legal Technology, Privacy, Technology Trends

The Decade in Legal Tech: The 10 Most Significant Developments

Robert Ambrogi describes and identifies why this was a decade of tumult and upheaval in legal technology, bringing changes that will forever transform the practice of law and the delivery of legal services. From the ubiquity of big data, to migrating applicationsto the cloud, and the increasing adoption AI, Ambrogi’s keen insights and comprehensive expertise make this article critical reading.

Subjects: AI, Case Management, Law Firm Marketing, Legal Ethics, Legal Research, Legal Technology, Technology Trends

Death of Colleague, Ken Strutin, Author of LLRX Criminal Justice Guides for 13 years

Kennard (Ken) R. Strutin, lawyer, law librarian, Director of Legal Information Services for the New York State Defenders Association, professor, author, teacher, colleague, friend and respected leader in the effort to illuminate the struggles of incarcerated persons and to champion justice for them, died on November 30, 2018 after a brief illness – he was …

Subjects: Big Data, Civil Liberties, Criminal Law, Ethics, Government Resources, Human Rights, Legal Education, Legal Ethics, Legal Research

Pain Science and the Administration of Justice

Ken Strutin’s article is a survey of legal scholarship and medical research concerning the study of pain and its significance for the administration of civil and criminal justice. The complexity of pain’s impact on each individual’s life is increasingly relevant in the context of the administration of civil and criminal justice. Strutin’s subject matter expertise in issues of law and justice is further articulated in this this article as he undertakes a timely review of an increasingly relevant issue that impacts the lives of defendants and complainants alike.

Subjects: Criminal Law, Human Rights, Legal Ethics, Medical Research, Publishing & Publishers (Legal)

Animal Rights on the Road to Personhood

Ken Strutin’s paper addresses a seminal issue that has been an integral part of the personal and collective ethic of diverse peoples around the world. As Strutin states, when life is classified biologically, it is also defined legally. Thus is formed the tension between the natural and juridical worlds. Whether animal rights can ever fall within the ambit of personhood will depend as much on the findings of cognitive science as on the evolution of legal remedies. Indeed, the foundations for nonhuman personhood are being laid in a growing body of litigation and scholarship at the borderlands of science and civil justice.

Subjects: Animals and the Law, Ethics, Human Rights, Legal Ethics, Legal Research

NY bar on ethics of cloud computing again

Nicole Black lauds the the leading edge role taken by the New York State Bar in determining issues related to lawyer use of cloud computing and client confidential data. In two different opinions handed down in the latter half of this year, the New York Bar committee reaffirmed the applicability of the longstanding duty of due diligence when assessing the security of third party service providers, explaining that a lawyer must assess whether the technology offers reasonable protections against disclosure and must also take reasonable precautions when using technology.

Subjects: Legal Ethics

Legal ethics and retention of electronic data

Lawyers are increasingly shifting their day to day operations to applications and operations that leverage the convenience and affordability offered by the concept of a paperless office. Attorney Nicole Black talks about how doing so can raise an assortment of ethical issues, since the confidentiality of client information must always be maintained, regardless of the format in which it is stored or distributed.

Subjects: E-Discovery, Features, Law Firm Marketing, Legal Ethics, Legal Profession, Software