Keynote: AI Transformation – Competing in the Age of AI #KMWorld

Knowledge sharing, social media and knowledge management expert V. Mary Abraham shares her readout and impressions of this timely and impactful keynote presented by Marco Iansiti, Harvard Business School Professor of Business Administration, and Coauthor of Competing in the Age of AI. Abraham’s insights encompass how the pandemic is accelerating enormous changes. Within 5-10 years, every organization will be run differently. Those who invest in digital transformation will do just fine. Those who do implement tangible change not will be left behind.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Communications, Information Architecture, KM, Management

The Next Social Media Frontier For Lawyers: Clubhouse

Clubhouse is an audio chat platform that is available as an iOS app and is invite only for now. It consists of user-created drop-in audio chat rooms. You can form your own chat room or join rooms created by others. These chat rooms can be created spontaneously or scheduled ahead of time. Nicole Black identifies how the app provides lawyers with opportunities to showcase your expertise, connect with professional colleagues who might be potential referral sources, and generate exposure for your law firm.

Subjects: Communication Skills, KM, Law Firm Marketing, Legal Marketing, Legal Profession, Social Media

As U.S. Capitol investigators use facial recognition, it begs the question: Who owns our faces?

In the age of Big Tech, we need to grapple with what expectations we can and should have about who has access to our faces. The recent riot at the U.S. Capitol has put the question into the spotlight as facial recognition becomes a vital tool in identifying rioters: What is the power of facial recognition technology, and are we ready for it? Professor Wendy H. Wong discusses what are the costs and consequences of losing our faces to data, including the right to privacy and our ability to live our lives free of surveillance.

Subjects: AI, Civil Liberties, KM, Legal Research, Privacy, Technology Trends

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 23, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: This Site Published Every Face From Parler’s Capitol Riot Videos; DHS Gets Sued Over Its Social Media Surveillance Tactics; and Lost Passwords Lock Millionaires Out of Their Bitcoin Fortunes; and The risks of DDoS attacks for the public sector.

Subjects: Congress, Criminal Law, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Digital Archives, Financial System, KM, Privacy, Social Media, Technology Trends

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 16, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: The evolving threat of ransomware: Beware of cyber extortion in 2021; What if opting out of data collection were easy?; How 5G and AI Are Creating an Architectural Revolution; and Insecure wheels: Police turn to car data to destroy suspects’ alibis.

Subjects: AI, Criminal Law, Cybercrime, Data Mining, Information Architecture, KM, Privacy, Social Media, Technology Trends

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 10, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: SolarWinds Hackers Got Into More Than 3,000 DOJ Email Accounts; Sealed U.S. Court Records Exposed in SolarWinds Breach; CISA:Hackers access to federal networks without SolarWinds; and State Department Approves Creation of Cyber Bureau.

Subjects: Computer Security, Criminal Law, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, E-Government, Email Security, KM, Legal Research, Privacy, Software, Spyware, Technology Trends

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, January 3, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Zoom scam alert: Never click on this kind of invite; The Most Dangerous People on the Internet in 2020; She didn’t know her kidnapper. But he was using Google Maps — and that cracked the case; and CISA updates SolarWinds guidance, tells US govt agencies to update right away.

Subjects: AI, Computer Security, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cybersecurity, Disaster Planning, E-Government, Economy, Email Security, Financial System, Government Contracts, Healthcare, Privacy, Search Engines

LLRX December 2020 Issue

Articles and Columns for December 2020 Masks and mandates: How individual rights and government regulation are both necessary for a free society – Professor Martha Ackelsberg is political theorist – she studies how communities are organized, how power is exercised and how people relate to one another in and between communities. Through talking to friends, …

Subjects: KM

Masks and mandates: How individual rights and government regulation are both necessary for a free society

Professor Martha Ackelsberg is political theorist – she studies how communities are organized, how power is exercised and how people relate to one another in and between communities. Through talking to friends, and thinking about the protests against COVID-19-related restrictions that have taken place around the country – she concluded that many people do not understand that individual rights and state power are not really opposites. The laws and policies that governments enact set the framework for the exercise of our rights. So, inaction on the part of government does not necessarily empower citizens. It can, effectively, take away our power, leaving us less able to act to address our needs.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Constitutional Law, Healthcare, Legal Research, Legislative, United States Law