Category «Legal Technology»

Toward a durable, dictator-proof Washington Post

David H. Rothman’s timely, outside the box commentary addresses the growing wave of news outlets abruptly closing down their websites, laying off staff, and in some cases, eliminating access to their respective archives. Rothman proposes an alternative to “how do I charge them enough” to stem the tide of closures, an avenue he prompts billionaire Jeff Bezos, owner of the Washington Post, to consider. A good-sized trust or corporate equivalent would enable the Washington Post to be run as a sustainable enterprise in the public interest, rather than as a mere profit generator.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Economy, Ethics, Free Speech, Freedom of Information, KM, Leadership, Management, Social Media, Technology Trends

Publishing for Profit: Selecting the Best Publisher

Jerry Lawson offers his expert advise on how lawyers (and other ambitious people) can profit by publishing. One method is to begin by focusing on your desired result. What are the best publishers for you and your work product? Lawson offers a couple of ways to identify the potential publishers likely to provide the most benefit.

Subjects: AI, Book Reviews, Communication Skills, KM, Search Engines, Social Media

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, February 24, 2024

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, finance, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: As AI Looms Large, FTC Says Big Tech Can’t Feed it Your Data Without Your Permission; Protect Yourself from Identity Thieves; Survey Finds Workers are Putting Businesses at Risk by Oversharing with GenAI Tools; and Meet the shady companies helping governments hack citizens’ phones.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Cybersecurity, Economy, Financial System, Government Resources, Healthcare, KM, Legal Research, Privacy, Social Media

DOJ funding pipeline subsidizes questionable big data surveillance technologies

Professor Andrew Guthrie Ferguson discusses how predictive policing has been shown to be an ineffective and biased policing tool. Yet, the Department of Justice has been funding the crime surveillance and analysis technology for years and continues to do so despite criticism from researchers, privacy advocates and members of Congress. Guthrie’s research reveals an entire ecosystem of how technology companies, police departments and academics benefit from the flow of federal dollars for these surveillance technologies.

Subjects: Big Data, Civil Liberties, Criminal Law, Legal Research, Privacy, Spyware

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, February 17, 2024

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, finance, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Inside the Underground Site Where ‘Neural Networks’ Churn Out Fake IDs; 5 Steps to Improve Your Security Posture in Microsoft Teams; Drone surveillance case in Michigan Supreme Court tests privacy rights; and ‘AI Washing’ Is a Risk Amid Wall Street’s Craze, SEC Chief Gesler Says.

Subjects: AI, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Email Security, Federal Legislative Research, Financial System, Firewalls, Healthcare, Legal Research, Privacy, Social Media, Spyware

AI in Banking and Finance, February 15, 2024

This semi-monthly column by Sabrina I. Pacifici highlights news, government documents, NGO/IGO papers, industry white papers, academic papers and speeches on the subject of AI’s fast paced impact on the banking and finance sectors. The chronological links provided are to the primary sources, and as available, indicate links to alternate free versions. Six highlights from this post: SEC Chair: Existing financial law can be applied to AI regulatory debate; Generative AI financial scammers are getting very good at duping work email; The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Algorithms; How Learning About Harms Impacts the Optimal Rate of Artificial Intelligence Adoption; Fighting Financial Crime With AI Is Not A Trend—It’s A Necessity; and NIST establishes Artificial Intelligence Safety Institute Consortium (AISIC).

Subjects: AI, AI in Banking and Finance, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Email Security, Financial System, Legal Research

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, February 3, 2024

Privacy and cybersecurity issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, finance, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and online security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: How to lock out your ex-partner from your smart home; Google is Still Failing to Protect Privacy of Abortion Seekers; Citibank fails to protect customers from fraud, N.Y. AG’s lawsuit contends; and Listening to LLM responses through leaked GPU local memory.

Subjects: AI, Cybersecurity, Healthcare, Privacy, Search Engines

LLRX January 2024 Issue

Articles and Columns for January 2024 The 2024 ‘Burning Issues’ Confronting Firm Leaders – At the end of December 2023, Patrick J, Mckeena and Michael B. Rynowecer presented 200 Firm Leaders with a selection of over 40 timely and potential ‘Burning Issues’ – and asked of them “what do you anticipate as the highest priorities …

Subjects: KM

Book Review: Transformative Negotiation Strategies for Everyday Change and Equitable Futures

Jerry Lawson writes – So you think you know how to negotiate? You’ve done some deals, maybe a lot, maybe some for big bucks. Maybe attended some classes. Maybe read some books. Surely you can’t have all that much left to learn, right? You may see things differently after reading this book. It’s like no other negotiation book I’ve encountered. It’s different because it has an unusual author and an unusual genesis.

Subjects: Education, KM, Legal Profession, Legal Research