Category «Legal Technology»

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues June 8, 2019

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Privacy concerns don’t stop people from putting their DNA on the internet to help solve crimes; Fake LinkedIn Profiles Are Impossible to Detect; Google quietly ruined Chrome, and we almost missed it; Enforcing Federal Privacy Law – Constitutional Limitations on Private Rights of Action.

Subjects: Criminal Law, Cyberlaw, Legal Research, Privacy, Search Engines, Social Media

Casetext’s New ‘SmartCite’ Citator Is Its Clever Answer to Shepard’s and KeyCite

Robert Ambrogi writes – “Knowing whether a case is good law is elemental to legal research. To do this, lawyers have long relied on citator services such as Shepard’s from LexisNexis and KeyCite from Westlaw. Now, the legal research service Casetext has introduced a citator of its own, called SmartCite, with many of the features you would expect to find in a citator, plus some that make it unique.”

Subjects: AI, Citators, KM, Legal Research, Legal Technology, Technology Trends

Terms, Tags, and Classification

It is helpful to classify documents or other content items to make them easier to find later. Searching the full text alone can retrieve inaccurate results or miss appropriate documents containing different words from the words entered into a search box. A document or content management system may include features for tagging, keywords, categories, indexing, etc. Taxonomist Heather Hedden identifies the difference between these elements to facilitate the implementation of more effective knowledge and content management.

Subjects: Business Research, Case Management, Competitive Intelligence, E-Discovery, Information Architecture, Information Mapping, KM

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues May 26, 2019

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Finland is winning the war on fake news. Other nations want the blueprint; Ari Mahairas and Peter Beshar on AI and 5G security risks; Age of fraud: Are seniors more vulnerable to financial scams?; Concern Growing Over ‘Nefarious’ Website Offering Individuals’ Personal Information, Reputation Rating.

Subjects: AI, Civil Liberties, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cybersecurity, Elder Law, Public Records, Technology Trends

Online Research Browsers 2019

Marcus Zillman’s guide highlights multifaceted browser alternatives to mainstream search tools that researchers may regularly use by default. There are many reliable yet underutilized applications that facilitate access to and discovery of subject matter specific documents and sources. Free applications included here also offer collaboration tools, resources to build and manage repositories, to employ data visualization, to create and apply metadata management, citations, bibliographies, document discovery and data relationship analysis.

Subjects: Business Research, KM, Search Engines, Search Strategies

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues May 11, 2019

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: The Challenges of Implanted Cardiac Device Security; Scammers Exploit Home Rental Listings With ‘Let Yourself In’ Link; New Rules On E-Evidence Could Streamline Criminal Investigations in the EU; and a Parental Advisory: Dating Apps

Subjects: Computer Security, Congress, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Government Resources, Internet Dating, Legislative, Privacy

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues May 5, 2019

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Google to roll out auto-delete controls for location history and activity data; Rights groups challenge warrantless cellphone searches at U.S. border; U.S. cyber spies unmasked many more American identities in 2018; and Spies, Lies, and Algorithms.

Subjects: AI, Government Resources, Information Management, KM, Legal Research, Mobile Technology, Privacy, Search Engines, Social Media, Technology Trends

Manage Information Overload Resources 2019

As we are challenged each day to expertly respond to an overwhelming amount of information, much of it not relevant to our requirements, it is a major undertaking to exercise our choices skillfully as well as to balance our knowledge resources to best serve our objectives. Marcus Zillman’s guide offers both broader resources on how to manage information overload, as well as sources, tools and techniques to facilitate research productivity.

Subjects: Internet Resources, Internet Resources - Web Links, KM, Legal Research, Technology Trends

Is it a “Good” Case? Can You Rely on BCite, KeyCite, and Shepard’s to Tell You?

Kristina L. Niedringhaus calls our attention to a recent article by Paul Heller whose research identified 357 citing relationships that one or more of the three major citators labeled as negative. “Out of these, all three citators agree that there was negative treatment only 53 times. This means that in 85% of these citing relationships, the three citators do not agree on whether there was negative treatment.”

Subjects: Citators, KM, Legal Research, Legal Research Training, Product Reviews, United States Law