Category «E-Discovery»

Deep Web Research and Discovery Resources 2019

How big is the Deep Web? It is estimated to comprise 7,500 terabytes – although an exact size is not known, and the figures vary widely on this question. The magnitude, complexity and siloed nature of the Deep Web is a challenge for researchers. You cannot turn to one specific guide or one search engine to effectively access the vast range of information, data, files and communications that comprise it. The ubiquitous search engines index, manage and deliver results from the Surface web. These search results include links, data, information, reports, news, subject matter content and a large volume of advertising that is optimized to increase traffic to specific sites and support marketing and revenue focused objectives. On the other hand, the Deep Web – which is often misconstrued as a repository of dark and disreputable information [Note – it is not the Dark Web], has grown tremendously beyond that characterization to include significant content on a wide range of subject matters covering a broad swath of files and formats, databases, pay-walled content as well as communications and web traffic that is not otherwise accessible through the surface Web. This comprehensive multifaceted guide by Marcus Zillman providers you with an abundance of resources to learn about, search, apply appropriate privacy protections, and maximize your time and efforts to conduct effective and actionable research within the Deep Web.

Subjects: Big Data, Business Research, Competitive Intelligence, Discovery, Encryption, Privacy, Search Engines, Search Strategies

Text Analysis Systems Mine Workplace Emails to Measure Staff Sentiments

Giving the processes of observation, analysis and change at the enterprise level a modern spin, is a fascinating new article in the September 2018 issue of The Atlantic, titled What Your Boss Could Learn by Reading the Whole Company’s Emails, by Frank Partnoy. Alan Rothmam summarizes and annotates this article that raises timely and significant issues around privacy, data mining and organizational management. Rothman concludes his review by posing important questions concerning the impact of text analysis data on executive training and development and on employee performance.

Subjects: AI, Data Mining, Email, Employment Law, KM, Privacy, Technology Trends

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues September 1 2018

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health/medical, to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways our privacy and security is diminished, often without our situational awareness. Note – two significant highlights of this week’s column: Woman Sues Border Agents to Make Them Return Data They Seized From Her Phone – and How Yahoo Is Mining For Gold in Your Junk Mail.

Subjects: Civil Liberties, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Data Mining, E-Commerce, Email, Government Resources, Privacy

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues July 7 2018

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health/medical, to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways our privacy and security is diminished, often without our situational awareness. Please note these entries for actionable information that is valuable to multiple sectors (law, finance, government) – New survey shows executives heavily underestimate cybersecurity threats and Entity resolution is big business. There are more than 50 firms that sell some kind of service based on this.

Subjects: Blockchain, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Data Mining, Economy, Privacy, Social Media

Stagnation And The Legal Industry (Part 2) What Real Transformative Change Could Look Like

In his article Ken Grady describes one possible future for the legal services that embodies radical transformation. He bases this new paradigm on Elon Musk’s premise: the only things unchangeable are the laws of nature. In the case of your law practice this means that regulations, custom, habits, and processes and procedures are all the focus of actionable change. Grady suggests specific ways that the innovative use of current technology and how you approach your work and client services can effectively and positively impact the not too distant future of your profession.

Subjects: AI, Case Management, E-Discovery, KM, Law Firm Marketing, Legal Profession, Legal Research, Legal Technology

Search Warrant Issued For Amazon Echo Data

An Amazon Echo device is the subject of a prosecutor’s search warrant related to an Arkansas murder case. Nicole Black illuminates how such devices are complicating issues related to consumer privacy and vendor responses to search warrants. The ubiquity of Internet of Things (IoT) devices in homes will no doubt result in more warrants for the data they collect.

Subjects: Criminal Law, Discovery, Gadgets, Legal Research, Privacy

Bots, Big Data, Blockchain, and AI – Disruption or Incremental Change?

Ron Friedmann discusses the potential, likely and unlikely impact of high profile disruptive technologies on Big Law – including Bid Data. blockchain, AI and bots.

Subjects: Big Data, Blockchain, Cyberlaw, E-Discovery, Legal Research, Social Media

Digital Smarts Everywhere: The Emergence of Ambient Intelligence

Alan Rothman’s article is based on a TechCrunch.com posting, The Next Stop on the Road to Revolution is Ambient Intelligence. Rothman offers an insightful analysis on how the rapidly expanding universe of digital intelligent systems wired into our daily routines is becoming more ubiquitous, unavoidable and ambient each day.

Subjects: Discovery, Internet Trends

Evolutions in DNA Forensics

Criminal law expert Ken Strutin’s new article is yet another research tour de force – a collection of recent and notable developments concerning DNA as forensic science, metric of guilt, herald of innocence, and its emerging place in the debate over privacy and surveillance. The increasing use of DNA evidence to support assumptions of an individual’s guilt and less frequently as a tool to prove the innocence of prisoners wrongly convicted, reflects many facets of the changing fabric of the American criminal justice, the role of the Fourth Amendment and the increasing collection of a wide range of biological evidence from crime scenes whose metadata then is searchable within the national DNA database.

Subjects: Criminal Law, Discovery, Legal Research

Deep Web Research and Discovery Resources 2016

Marcus Zillman has a longstanding and comprehensive expertise pertaining to the Deep Web. The Deep Web or Dark Web covers trillions of pages of information held in dynamically generated repositories throughout the global web that remain inaccessible through popular applications and search engines. Searching for this information using deeper search techniques and the latest algorithms allows researchers to obtain a vast amount of information that was previously unavailable or inaccessible, in fields that include the sciences and maths, corporate and financial data, and data only surfaced using file sharing applications. Zillman’s new guide documents a wide range of sources to improve your research results, including articles and paper, cross database search services and tools, peer to peer and file sharing engines, and semantic web resources.

Subjects: Data Mining, Evaluation of Internet Resources, Internet Resources - Web Links, Open Source, Search Engines, Search Strategies, Technology Trends
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