Category «Big Data»

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, December 11, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Convincing Microsoft phishing uses fake Office 365 spam alert; Consumer Reports conducted an in-depth test of 16 well-known VPNs; How and why people use password managers; and Senator Doubles Down On Data Privacy, Sends Letter to CFPB.

Subjects: Big Data, Business Research, Competitive Intelligence, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Financial System, Privacy, Social Media, Technology Trends

Finding People Resources and Sites 2022

This guide by Marcus Zillman identifies a wide range of free and fee based resources from which to choose to conduct people searches as well as brand and company reputation research, for business or personal reasons. It is important to note that the largest and most prominent data aggregators resell their content to other sites. In addition, data on free and some fee based sites may not be cleansed and can include inaccuracies that range from minor to critical. Also, many sites offer free search but charge a fee to review the results. It is therefore advisable to use multiple sources in your research and compare and contrast results before pursuing the use of these data.

Subjects: Big Data, Business Research, Competitive Intelligence, Data Mining, KM, Legal Research, LEXIS, Reference Resources, Search Engines, Search Strategies, Social Media, Westlaw

A new ratings industry is emerging to help homebuyers assess climate risks

Matthew E. Kahn studies environmental economics, and in his recent book, “Adapting to Climate Change: Markets and the Management of an Uncertain Future”, he explores how the rise of Big Data will help people, firms and local governments make better decisions in the face of climate risks. He sees the emergence of a climate risk analysis industry for real estate as a promising development, but believe the federal government should set standards to ensure that it provides reliable, accurate information.

Subjects: Big Data, Business Research, Economy, Environmental Law, Financial System, KM

How Data Analytics Can Change the Way Law Firms Do Business

Lisa M. (Bradford) Mayo, Director of Data and Analytics at Ballard Spahr LLP identifies how and why data and analytics are on the forefront of much of the firm’s modern technology offerings. Unlike many firms, Ballard’s data and analytics function sits inside their Client Value and Innovation department, where they have some latitude with a research and development budget and the directive to “fail fast” if they determine a proof-of-concept did not meet our needs. The firm’s data management mission statement says in part that we “contribute to the firm’s strategic goals by using innovative technologies, a variety of flexible and adaptive data sources, artificial intelligence/machine learning, and ongoing data literacy education to help redefine the Firm’s internal performance objectives and accountability drivers and transform how the Firm delivers legal services to its clients.” Just 48 words but loaded with meaning and purpose, both for now and in the foreseeable future.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Case Management, Competitive Intelligence, Ethics, Information Architecture, Information Mapping, KM, Leadership, Legal Marketing, Technology Trends

Cybercrime and Digital Transformation

Cybercrime is on the rise all around the world. As more companies adopt technology such as artificial intelligence (AI), big data, and cloud computing, they become more vulnerable to hackers who want to gain access to the valuable information stored on their systems. It is estimated that cybercrime costs companies over £3.1 billion in 2020 alone on a global level. Imran Zaman, an expert on Digital Disruption with Fortune 500 companies, advises regardless of whether you are a large corporation or a small business, cybercrime is something everyone needs to be concerned about in the Age of Digital Transformation.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Blockchain, Computer Security, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Email, Email Security, Firewalls, Privacy, Software, Spyware

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, October 10, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: 2021 Guide to Internet Privacy Resources and Tools; It’s time to start taking digital identity seriously; There’s a Multibillion-Dollar Market for Your Phone’s Location Data; and It’s Time to Stop Paying for a VPN.

Subjects: Big Data, Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, Cybersecurity, E-Commerce, Economy, Financial System, Privacy, Social Media

2021 Guide to Internet Privacy Resources and Tools

Technology has significantly changed our concept of privacy as well as our ability to maintain it. The are a wide spectrum of tools, services and strategies available to assist you in the effort to maintain a sliding scale of privacy in an increasingly porous, insecure online environment. Whether you are browsing the internet, using email or SMS, encrypting data on PCs or mobile phones, trying to choose the best VPN, or working to secure your online services from cybercrime, hacking or surveillance, Marcus Zillman has identified a wide range of sources for you to consider. The foundational issue regarding privacy is that you must be proactive, diligent and persistent in evaluating and using multiple applications for email, search, file transfer, and social media. There is no “one size fits all” solution, and your vigilance and willingness to remain flexible in applying effective solutions are part of an ongoing process.

Subjects: Big Data, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Email Security, Encryption, Internet Trends, Search Engines, Search Strategies, Social Media, Technology Trends

Pete Recommends – Weekly highlights on cyber security issues, September 18, 2021

Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Apple’s Plan to Scan Your Phone Raises the Stakes on a Key Question: Can You Trust Big Tech?; ‘Breach of trust’: Police using QR check-in data to solve crimes; Agencies may want to establish a national strategy for contact-tracing apps; and Americans have little trust in online security: AP-NORC poll.

Subjects: Big Data, Blockchain, Computer Security, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Data Mining, Gadgets/Gizmos, Healthcare, Legal Research, Privacy

Data privacy laws in the US protect profit but prevent sharing data for public good – people want the opposite

Cason Schmit, Brian N. Larson and Hye-Chung Kum are faculty at the school of public health and the law school at Texas A&M University with expertise in health information regulation, data science and online contracts. U.S. data protection laws often widely permit using data for profit but are more restrictive of socially beneficial uses. They wanted to ask a simple question: Do U.S. privacy laws actually protect data in the ways that Americans want? Using a national survey, we found that the public’s preferences are inconsistent with the restrictions imposed by U.S. privacy laws.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Digital Archives, Health, Healthcare, Information Management, KM, Privacy

Machines Learning the Rule of Law – EU Proposes the World’s first Artificial Intelligence Act

Sümeyye Elif Biber is a PhD Candidate in Law and Technology at the Scuola Sant’Anna in Pisa. In 21 April 2021, the European Commission (EC) proposed the world’s first Artificial Intelligence Act (AIA). The proposal has received a warm welcome across the EU as well as from the US, as it includes substantial legal provisions on ethical standards. After its release, the media’s main focus laid on the proposal’s “Brussels Effect”, which refers to the EU’s global regulatory influence: EU laws exceed their “local” influence and become global standards. With the AIA, the EU has the potential to become the world’s “super-regulator” on AI. More than the Brussels Effect, however, the emphasis should lie on the EU’s intention to explicitly protect the rule of law against the “rule of technology”. Despite this expressed goal, the normative power of the regulation to ensure the protection of the rule of law seems inadequate and raises serious concerns from the perspective of fundamental rights protection. This shortcoming becomes most evident across three main aspects of the AIA, namely in the regulation’s definition of AI systems, the AI practices it prohibits, and the preeminence of a risk-based approach.

Subjects: AI, Big Data, Civil Liberties, Legal Research, Privacy