Author archives

Conrad J. Jacoby, Esq. Conrad Jacoby is the founder of efficientEDD, a consultancy focusing on the areas of electronic discovery, litigation information management, and litigation support technology. A seasoned litigator as well as a technology consultant, Mr. Jacoby writes and speaks extensively about electronic discovery issues. From February 2006 through February 2008, his "E-Discovery Update" column on LLRX.com was made possible through support from Fios, Inc., a provider of electronic discovery processing services.

Testing the Accuracy of Database Information Produced in Civil Discovery

Conrad J. Jacoby identifies the trend that increasingly electronically stored information (“ESI”) requested in litigation discovery originates in databases or other structured data repositories. Previously, this data was stored in discrete e-mail messages, spreadsheets, and word processing files that have long made up the bulk of most ESI document productions. Businesses creating and managing their accumulated information have discovered that they are able to extract far more utility if they store their data in a single repository and in a standardized format.

Subjects: Discovery, E-Discovery, Features, Technology Trends

Of Refrigerators and E-Discovery

Conrad J. Jacoby’s commentary offers perspective on the complexities and nuances of technology innovations, in the home and in the office, causing him to reflect on how incomplete or incorrect impressions of how a responding party organizes and manages its business records impacts knowledge management and e-records.

Subjects: Case Management, Digital Archives, E-Discovery, E-Discovery Update, Features, Information Architecture, Legal Technology

Getting Educated at LegalTech New York 2010

Conrad J. Jacoby provides an overview of the New York LegalTech show and conference, long one of the preeminent opportunities to catch a glimpse of the future of legal technology. Conrad highlights how the conference provides a surprisingly accurate snapshot of litigation support, electronic discovery, and even the health of the legal industry as a whole.

Subjects: Case Management, E-Discovery, Information Management, Legal Profession, Legal Technology

Understanding the Limitations – and Maximizing the Value – of eBooks

The holiday season is here, and many signs suggest that thousands of people are finding themselves new owners of electronic book (“eBook”) readers. Whether it’s an Amazon Kindle, a Barnes & Noble Nook, a Sony Reader, or any of the less heavily advertised devices currently on the market, electronic book readers are being trumpeted as a product that has finally hit the mainstream after years on the bleeding-edge. eBook readers, in fact, do have the potential to radically reshape how books are read. Equally important, according to Conrad J. Jacoby, they are already reshaping how books are bought and owned.

Subjects: Features

ILTA 2009: Smaller, Cheaper… Better?

Attorney and legal IT expert Conrad J. Jacoby believes participants in this year’s conference were hungry for the knowledge available there, for the ability to see in-depth presentations of products, and to attend personal briefings with high-level vendor-side programmers and product directors.

Subjects: Legal Technology

E-Discovery Update: Revisiting ESI Agreements and Court Orders

Conrad J. Jacoby focuses on the new requirement that litigants must meet early in a dispute to discuss the scope of discovery work to reach agreement on how best to proceed with the discovery of potentially relevant electronically stored information (“ESI”). What happens, though, when fundamental assumptions used to reach agreement at that early stage in the case turn out to be incorrect?

Subjects: Case Management, E-Discovery, Legal Profession, Legal Technology

E-Discovery Update: My E-Discovery Holiday Wish List

Conrad J. Jacoby’s holiday wish is for the legal community to finally develop one or more judicially accepted standards that can be used to craft consistent ways of requesting and producing information. With baseline procedures in place, both producing and requesting parties, as well as judges, will be able to make more informed decisions about the need for discovery and the way in which such discovery should be conducted.

Subjects: Case Management, Discovery, E-Discovery
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