Category «Legal Technology»

Deep Web Research and Discovery Resources 2017

This report and guide by internet guru Marcus P. Zillman provides researchers with a comprehensive and wide ranging bibliography of “deep web” data, information, documents, code, papers, applications and cutting edge tools. They may be used individually, in groups and in combination, as key drivers to build approaches and queries to harness knowledge and information services that create strategic, actionable results for your clients, users and customers, across all communities of best practice.

Subjects: Business Research, Competitive Intelligence, Internet Resources, Reference Resources, Search Engines, Search Strategies

#GovDocs2Trump Tweetathon and End of Term Harvest

Debbie Rabina, Ph.D., Professor, Pratt Institute, School of Information posted this blog that merits sharing for both its intent, the use of Twitter to attract the attention of the President-Elect, and the crowd sourcing concept. Rabina states: America deserves a president who is well versed in the history of this nation and the documents upon which that history was built. Let’s present those documents to the President-Elect through his favorite medium–Twitter. Tweetathon began at 9am (central) on December 1, 2016. You are welcome to join at any time. Feel free to use whatever government related document (Supreme Court decisions, inaugural addresses, speeches, early American papers, etc.) strikes your fancy. Tag each tweet with the hashtag #GovDocs2Trump and please send them to @realdonaldtrump. This way we can fill his feed.

Subjects: Education, Government Resources, Information Management, Internet Resources - Web Links, Leadership, Legal Research, United States Law

Forensic Business Development Research

Legal marketing and business development expert Eric Dewey defines a new term for a multifaceted expert work product and deliverable that librarians are uniquely positioned to develop, implement and manage in a critical leadership role for customers.

Subjects: KM, Law Firm Marketing, Law Librarians, Leadership, Legal Marketing, Legal Research, Legal Technology, Libraries & Librarians, Library Marketing, Management

Are you using a cell phone for s-l-o-w reading? And how about other reading?

David Rothman addresses an often overlook paradigm shift – using a smartphone for slow reading. You almost always have your smartphone with you. And with an estimated 190 million smartphone users in the US, Rothman posits that the discipline of reading on a small screen device can be learned, absent distractions (such as email and social media intrusions). Reading is fundamental (RIF), but the way we read has fundamentally shifted. Read on!

Subjects: E-Books, Education

Info Today columnist recs National Digital Library Endowment idea to Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden

David Rothman is a consistent, expert advocate for funding a national digital library endowment, and his enthusiasm has been strengthened with the appointment of Dr. Carla Hayden as the new librarian of Congress.

Subjects: Economy, Government Resources, Information Management, Libraries & Librarians, Library Marketing, Reference Resources

Yes, Dragon NaturallySpeaking has been worth the trouble for faster writing

David H. Rothman writes about the multiple uses of voice recognition software from the perspective of an expert writer, speaker and typist. Rothman also advises readers on the requisite microphone and boom to enhance the use of voice recognition technology.

Subjects: Gadgets/Gizmos, Product Reviews, Technology Trends

Law Librarians Flinch At Change? Can’t Say That I Agree With You David

Greg Lambert eloquently gives voice to truth which has been delivered through action by many fellow professionals throughout the course of our respective (some decades long) careers – we are not “gatekeepers” nor do we impede the purchase and distribution of innovative, subject matter focused, effective, forward moving technologies, services and resources within our respective organizations. To the contrary, change and disruption are often associated with the work of law librarians, knowledge managers and research professionals in firms.

Subjects: KM, Law Librarians, Legal Education, Legal Marketing, Legal Profession, Legal Research, Legal Research Training, Legal Technology, Libraries & Librarians

Peter Drucker and the Forward Focused Mindset

Author, professor, editor Bruce Rosenstein highlights his 10 Elements of the Future based on his many years of study of Peter Drucker’s work. These elements are an actionable resource for proactively and positively engaging with the multifaceted challenges and opportunities we are encountering in our work places and personal lives.

Subjects: KM, Management

Deans of Virginia University Libraries to Chairman Goodlatte: First Do No Harm in Copyright Revision

UVA Director of Information Policy Brandon Butler explains the implications of the Copyright Office plan to to issue a total rewrite of Section 108 of the Copyright Act and provides context on such a decision, which protects library and archives’ copying for preservation and research. Libraries and archives have said they do not want this, but the Office seems to be determined to do it. So, a group of Deans and Directors of Virginia university libraries has sent a letter to House Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) to ensure he realizes the controversy and context that surrounds the Office’s proposed changes. If you are a concerned library or librarian, consider writing your representative, especially if they sit on the Judiciary Committee.

Subjects: Congress, Copyright, Intellectual Property, Law Librarians, Legislative

Locating Foreign Civil Codes

Lyonette Louis-Jacques expertly guides us with this pathfinder on the research required to comprehensively address the frequently asked foreign and comparative law research question – how do I to find a country’s civil code?. A researcher might not know they need a civil code, but they often do. A civil code is the key to accessing all types of private law for many civil law jurisdictions. Modeled after the Code Napoléon or Code civil des Français (1804), a civil code usually contains laws relating to personal status, contracts, torts, “delict”, “obligations”, real and personal property, inheritance and succession, marriage, divorce, family, parent and child, private international law (conflict of laws/choice of law).

Subjects: American Association of Law Libraries, Comparative/Foreign Law, Government Resources, Legal Research, Online Legal Research Services
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